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Health Insurance Exchanges Will Mainly Be Run by Feds

Health Insurance Exchanges Will Mainly Be Run by Feds

Federal government will establish exchanges for 26 states; state-run exchanges for 17 states, D.C.

FRIDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of the states within the United States will allow the federal government to establish health insurance exchanges, according to a report issued by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Noting that several states delayed exchange-building pending the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court and the results of the presidential election, all states have now decided who will run their health insurance exchanges. To encourage states to play an active role, the federal government proposed partnering with states to establish the exchanges.

According to the report, 26 states will allow the federal government to establish health insurance exchanges; 17 states and the District of Columbia will run their own exchanges; and seven states will run the exchanges in partnership with the federal government. Most states that will have federal-run exchanges are led by Republican governors, and include heavily populated states like Florida and Texas. An estimated 25 million people are expected to gain coverage through the exchanges by 2022, and about 18 million people with incomes up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level may quality for assistance through the exchanges. Some state exchanges will limit consumer choices to the best value health plans, while federal exchanges will include all health plans; however, consumers may not be able to differentiate between state- versus federal-run exchanges.

"No matter where a qualified consumer lives, he or she will have access to coverage through a marketplace," Kathleen Sebelius, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary, said in a recent blog post.

More Information (http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparemaptable.jsp?ind=962&cat=17 )